Inside CIPSEM – a look behind the scenes …

… of the ongoing 77th UNEP/UNESCO/BMU International Short Course on Ecosystem Management – Biodiversity Conservation and Ecosystem Services

Well, the course already started August 29th and a lot happened inside and outside the classroom. Here are some insights …

by Ms. Moselantja Rahlao, Lesotho:

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Hello I am Moselantja Rahlao and I work for the Department of Range Resources Management, Ministry of Forestry and Soil Conservation, Lesotho. Welcome to the Kingdom in the Sky in Germany. Lesotho is a tiny country enclaved by another in Southern Africa.

It takes courage and passion to write application essays for the 77th UNEP/UNESCO/BMU International short course on Ecosystem management- Biodiversity Conservation and Ecosystem Services. Biophysical assessments are energy demanding. I do that on horseback, yes I am a rider. During data collection, I find myself staying uncomfortably in poky shelters of Lesotho. However, streams of passion to learn and be exposed never run dry. Usually after a completion of a hectic day, one wants only a good bath, food and sleep or entertainment at least. When everyone else prioritized the aforementioned and took a well-deserved break, I chose to sacrifice and compromise to achieve. However, my inquisitive nature coupled with thirst for knowledge sets me apart and makes me competent. I thrived because I dreamed, planned and acted “If you want to live your dreams, deny yourself any type of excuse”. I always apply effort and energy in things that I believe in for my growth. Then I work to proof myself to myself not anyone.

It was a heap of applications received (off course I knew this on arrival at CIPSEM) with very slim chances of being selected. This is a challenge of survival of the fittest measured by how logical one is, relevant content matters and what CIPSEM decides. Once this phase is passed, one can celebrate yippee. It was a moment of excitement and boosted confidence.

Logistically ready and hip-hip hooray! I landed in Dresden. The first day was tiresome after about 20hours flight (including layovers). A brief orientation done blah-blah-blah… and my heart began to palpitate faster. Next day, as the sun rose, I smiled and patted myself as I whispered “well done you are finally here”. Now ready to meet my fellow participants and the CIPSEM team. I take pride in my achievement to represent the Mountain Kingdom in Germany and interact with international fellows on the short course. It is exactly twenty (20) countries represented, namely: Indonesia, Cameroon, Guatemala, Mexico, Vietnam, Georgia, Turkmenistan, Ghana, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Rwanda, Haiti, Argentina, Brazil, Bhutan, El Salvador, Malaysia, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Armenia and of course Lesotho. Wow! What a diversity of culture, experience and knowledge.

Now anxiety and enthusiasm knocks daily to learn, network, exchange knowledge through participation throughout the course. We are here, stood out to be counted. Thinking individually but together towards conservation of biological diversity for enhancement of human wellbeing. The program runs from lecture hall with various experts to field excursion to get in depth knowledge. It is impossible to walk in nature and be in a bad mood. My best highlight was the stay on Isle of Vilm. The simulation on CBD-COP negotiation was eye opening to all participants. It went from just a practice to real emotional involvement, very defensive and argumentative. It takes the trophy. It was also a pleasure to celebrate my birthday at Baltic Sea Island. Surely, the course objectives will be accomplished by end of September, 2019. Yes, the course will end but never the memories with a good company. Never! We will go back to our countries and apply the knowledge, skills and experience gained. Lastly, “in a changing environment one either adapts, moves or die”. What an honor to be swimming in this pool of knowledge. A well-organized course and great gratitude to the sponsors. It would not be possible without them. Salute!

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Nature Talks – Experiencing the International “Nature” of Negotiations

by Ms. Fitria Rinawati, Indonesia et.al.:

“You cannot negotiate with people who say what’s mine is mine and what’s yours is negotiable” – John F. Kennedy

One among many highlights of the CIPSEM 77th UNEP/UNESCO/BMU International Short Course on Ecosystem Management – Biodiversity Conservation and Ecosystem Services is how we can experience such negotiations related to biodiversity conservation in international events. This time we had the opportunity to do a negotiation simulation “CBD-COP decision on biofuels”. What a topic! It is so current that most countries are paying attention to it. Including small – fragile – island countries which are not necessarily able to produce it but might be impacted from it.
The simulation was set to get an agreement of the drafted decision text. Participants were grouped as delegations into 6 countries that have the right to vote: Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, European Union, Ethiopia and Tuvalu, and 2 observers consisting in the United States and Greenpeace. One can imagine the dynamic of such a simulation when biofuels talk is involving the main producer countries like Indonesia and Brazil, the opposer of biofuels production – Saudi Arabia (main fossil fuels producer) and free riders such as the United States and Tuvalu – a very-very small island country that might face sinking due to climate change as a result of biofuels production practices.
Negotiation skills, wording the talks, emotional statements, creative compromises, building up pressure…were among the things we practiced and learned. Another main thing we learned was that every country has its interests and the delegations try to defend them – as it is well said in JFK above quote.
Further, we watched the movie “Guardians of the Earth”, a movie on UNFCCC – COP21 (Paris Agreement) which pictured clearly the above described negotiation processes. An interesting point, raised from a Bahrain young woman negotiator in the movie, was that all the international nature talks and negotiations were not about nature but but on economic interests of each country. Above all, we understand the great responsibility of the delegates to defend their country’s interests as well as the chairman – the president – the secretariat to come to such consensus and agreements. Last but not least, the importance of NGOs and other parties that influence these talks is also something that we can’t diminish.
I believe that among us the participants of CIPSEM 77th International Short Course, – there are possible future leaders of our countries. Thus, with the skills we learned, the knowledge we gained and the senses we built up through this course, we would be empowered to negotiate more reasonable in an international event and manage the ecosystem and the earth in a better way.
“Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate” – John F. Kennedy

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The “CBD-COP decisions on biofuels” negotiations – simulation chaired by Dr. Axel Paulsch (photo by Mr. Yew Aun Quek)
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Solving a forest belt problem in Ukraine – a Role Play @CIPSEM

The “Role Play” plays a significant role in problem-solving activities. Its concept follows the “power-free dialogue.” The German sociologist Jürgen Habermas designed this concept. The EM41 CIPSEM participants used this technique (29/05/2018) to find the solution to the following problem:

A forest belt system was planted in the former USSR to combat erosion, droughts and increasing yields. Depending on the planted species, it could increase yields by 20-100 . After the collapse of the USSR the department responsible for forest belt management was terminated. The follow-up legislation was not created accurately in Ukraine. Communities in cooperation with an NGO who have registered a forest strip cutting outside the settlement have applied to the local government body. In the public cadastral map, there is no cadastral number for the forest belt, therefore it is not possible to legally install an owner. On the other hand the State Administration stated, that their powers do not apply to agricultural forest bands. The State Geo Cadaster declared that these bands were transferred to the collective ownership of the collective farms, and therefore belong to the successor who did not correctly draw up his right, so they are subject to transfer to the Rural Council as a “waste of property”.

The following stakeholder groups were represented in the role play:

  • Ministry of Agriculture and Land Use
  • Ministry of Environment
  • Regional Government and land use planning
  • Council of villagers, composed of small-scale farmers
  • EcoLtava (regional NGO, doing consultancy services)
  • Large-scale agro-holdings
  • Timber and fuel producer

The fellows had an excellent discussion about the forest belt, land use change, legislation, environmental management, stakeholder collaboration and made their recommendations and solutions for the forest belt issue in Ukraine.

by Mkhitar Avetisyan (Republic of Armenia)

Course theory in a reality check

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“How a role play by the International Academy for Nature Conservation (INA) helped coping with convention negotiations”

by Mr. Mamadou Welle – Senegal

Alumnus of the 39th UNEP/UNESCO/BMUB International Postgraduate Course on Environmental Management

From 29 May 2017 to 2 June 2017 I had the opportunity to participate to the 53rd standing committee of the Ramsar Convention in Gland, Switzerland. More than 100 delegates hailing from 50 countries, representatives of Ramsar’s six International Organization Partners (IOPs) and several independent observers attended this event. The Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Importance is an international treaty for the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands. It is named after the city of Ramsar in Iran, where the convention was signed in 1971.

The work was organized around regional meetings, subgroup meetings and plenary sessions. A series of documents, compiled by the Secretary General of the Convention, served as the basis for exchanges between the delegations of the contacting parties, observers and representatives of the IOPs. Issues relating to the structuring of the convention, management procedures, action plans and strategies for sustainable management of wetlands were discussed in depth. Regional meetings gathered every morning delegates of each region of the world. This helped them harmonize their positions and discuss relevant issues specific to their region. Draft resolutions were proposed, discussed, validated or rejected during plenary. The principle of consensus has been the rule for making decisions.

As it was the first time I attended such international meeting, the acuity of the issues, the diversity of participants and their commitments in defending their views could have been daunting.  Luckily it was manageable for me to deal with all raised points and to be a fair but determined negotiator on behave of my home country, and other West African countries, which are represented by Senegal  in the Ramsar committee. Actually I did not have to start from scratch! I felt rather at ease because I could fall back to the tips that I had received during the role play about international convention negotiations in the International Academy for nature Conservation (INA) on Vilm Island during the 39th International Postgradudate Course on Environmental Management for Developing and Emerging Countries during my time at CIPSEM!

The 13th conference of the Contracting Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (COP13) will be held in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates from 21 to 29 October 2018.  Let’s make an appointment there!

International Nature Conservation on the Island of Vilm

An escape awaited with anxiety for the whole group of the 40th International Course on Environmental Management (EM40) to attend the module of “International Nature Conservation” at the International Academy for Nature Conservation Isle of Vilm, located in the Northern Part of Germany (Baltic Sea).  This trip began on a perfect sunny day in March, on platform 17 of Dresden’s Central Station. “The Isle of Vilm”, our destination, a wonderful biosphere reserve located on the Baltic Sea.

We were expecting about 8 hours by train ahead of us, but we knew it would be worth it, and we were not wrong, as we were welcomed by a wonderful sunset, slowly hiding in the Baltic Sea and some beautiful flower blooming along the pathway. The team in charge of the management of the Island introduced us about the historical background, features and rules to be observed by all the guests coming to the Vilm Island.  As a matter of fact, the Isle of Vilm (94 ha in area), was established as a nature reserve since 1936 and has been one of the core areas of the Southeast –Rügen Biosphere Reserve.

Some comments and reflection from 4 participants:

Benrina Demoh Kanu, Sierra Leone

The manner in which the concept of Protected Areas, trends, benefits and how the fact and figures were analyzed during the session was fascinating. During the session the participants get a clear understanding as to why we need protected areas, their benefits and also we were given the opportunity to decide whether the World Heritage Convention is a tool for conservation.

The most interesting thing was the fact that, years back, nature was protected mainly because of its intrinsic values and we see a shift from that dimension to protecting nature because of its economic, social, cultural and ecological arguments. Also there is a shift of paradigms from the former concept were in the central government runs the affairs of Protected Areas to an inclusive concept that caters for partnership and in most cases run with/for/by the people.

Therefore, our visit to the National Natural Heritage Center Rügen and the Jasmund National Park was a confirmation that Protected Areas do not only serve as conservation tool, but also soothes the soul.

Marle Aguilar Ponce- Honduras

The 2nd day of the module on “International Nature Conservation”, was very interesting, the Topic? Access and benefit-sharing (ABS) and marine nature conservation. Personally, ABS is a topic that I was looking forward to discuss with my colleagues, and I was sure that it will generate many questions and discussion; especially about the examples and case study generated during the presentation.

Although I could say that, the biggest prize, was the practice or play role on fish banks and sustainable fishing, letting us met, what I call “the dark side” of each one of us as representatives of fishing companies. But also leaves us with the task, of analyze our current situation in relation to the use and overexploitation of all our resources (and biodiversity), and the availability of these resources for our next generation.

Another thing that I really enjoyed of our trip in Vilm Island was the little but effective excursion trough the Island, and learning about its history and stories, emblematic species and fascinating characteristics like its particular forest and all the spectaculars landscapes that we could see from the Island.

Moussa Lamine, Niger

The theoretical lectures and practical exercises related to the concept of Biodiversity, the Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) and the negotiating processes at the conferences of the Parties to the Convention, were really impressive. To crown it all, the simulation game on biofuels gave a compressive understanding on how the negotiation processes are done in real life, even though we recognized that in real life negotiation and discussions process are more stressful and intensives.

Ahmed Said Sulaiman, Ethiopia

A short film on Teff (a fine grain grown predominantly in Ethiopia) showcasing the possibilities of exploring the benefit sharing gave an insight on the impact on development and conservation.

Another interesting theme was the Red List of species of IUCN and its application in conservation. It was surprising to know how little is known about the existing species. For example currently only 61,914 species have been assessed.

The role play game on marine nature conservation thought us how to intermarry the goals of sustainable resource use, while on the other hand facing competition from the market and at the same time maximizing profit. By practicing the game, we have learned that cooperation and communication among stakeholders can improve the situation and bring a win-win situation. It was also evident that short term thinking will serve only limited time, and flexible and forward decisions could help to avoid potential surprises in the future.

“Without any doubt, the stay of EM40 on the wonderful Island of Vilm was a spectacular learning and pleasant experience, Memories we will never forget’’.

Local water supply and climate change in Bolivia – role play

In an Andean Village, the traditional water supply system is failing due to changing framework conditions. How should the supply system be developed? How to take into account uncertainties and different interests? Prepared with individual background reading, our Environmental Management course participants represent different stakeholder groups in a meeting to agree on the future strategy for a water supply system.

The role play develops academic as well as practical skills and helps to recognise the complexity of negotiations and professional practice.